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If you’ve read my book, done my invert programme or follow my social media accounts, you’ll know how much I LOVE this exercise!

It allows you to work through pretty much the full movement pattern of the invert to chopper, on the floor and with the support of the ball. It’s awesome not only for pole dancers who are first learning this move, but also for experienced pole dancers to condition and refine the correct engagement of their invert and chopper.

Magical.

I’ve had a few messages recently from pole dancers who are struggling to perform this exercise because the ball keeps rolling away from them. Gah!

So here are some extra tips and cues on the stability ball chopper to help you get to grips with it, control that ball and nail your invert to straddle!

If you’d rather watch than read, here is this full blog post in video format:

The stability ball invert looks easy but it’s HARD!

The first thing to note is that this exercise may look easy, but it’s HARD! You are still working all the same things as the ‘full’ movement up the pole. Yes, the ball is giving you a little support, but it is also VERY unstable. You still need a lot of upper body strength and core engagement to control it!

If the tips in this blog don’t help and the stability ball invert is still not happening for you, you just may not be ready for it yet. Go back to working on your upper body horizontal pulling strength and your core engagement as well as some easier ground-based pole progressions and come back to it later!

TIP 1: Sit towards the front of the ball

Don’t be afraid to play around with the positioning and find the right ‘sweet spot’ for you! If you sit further forwards on the ball, as you roll back, you will end up with more of your back in contact with the ball, so it will give you more support and stability.

TIP 2: Sit on the middle to outside of the ball

Again, play around with what works best for you! If you sit too close to the inside edge of the ball, it will roll around a lot more! I’d recommend sitting more towards the middle/outside of the ball.

TIP 3: Start facing the ceiling

If you start in an upright position, you won’t be able to get all the way back into your chopper. Start leaning back in a more horizontal position, facing the ceiling.

TIP 4: Don’t push off!

Resist the temptation to push off the floor with your feet! Even the tiniest little push can send you rolling everywhere! Be strict with yourself. If you need to, lift one foot at a time – slowly!

TIP 5: Work on progressions!

If your core and horizontal pulling strength is solid and you feel ready for the stability ball chopper but it STILL isn’t happening – find a progression!

For example, you can have someone hold and guide the ball for you to provide a little extra stability, or you can try keeping one foot on the floor to stop the ball rolling around. A small adjustment like this may be all you need to make it work.

TIP 6: Reset between reps!

Make sure you reset your position between reps! The ball does move around a lot (I mean, it’s a ball, it’s literally its job to roll), so if you try to smash out rep after rep, without resetting in between, the ball will end up all over the place.

Hope these tips help! If you have any questions at all, please feel free to get in touch! I’m on Instagram and Facebook!

Want MORE pole-specific strength and conditioning exercises to help you on your pole ninja mission? My book, Strength and Conditioning for Pole is available now – over 400 pages of pole strength geeking awaits!

Strength and conditioning book pole dance

Exercises and information on this website is provided for educational purposes only. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should consult your Doctor or health care professional before doing any exercises or fitness programs to determine if they are right for your needs.

 

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